Kelly’s Closet Turns 14 {and They’re Giving Away Mama Cloth!}

KC14yrPinkLemonade

We are so excited to help Kelly’s Closet and DiaperShops.com celebrate 14 years of cloth diapering! KC has been my go to for modern cloth diapers and accessories since we started adding to our homemade stash a couple years ago.  Through them we have discovered CJ’s BUTTer, our favorite Thirsties diapers, and a plethora of other brands and products.

Kelly’s Closet first opened its doors back in April 2001 well before bumGenius, Rumparooz, GroVia and Thirsties even existed.  Kelly’s Closet is now home to almost 100 brands of cloth diapers, diapering accessories, and eco-friendly products for the entire family.  They are truly more than just a shop.  While located solely online, they give AMAZING customer service and product support that you won’t find in many store fronts.  They reach through the computer screen and engage with customers every day, providing cloth diaper education and support to thousands daily.

KellysCloset14yrsOn April 1st, Kelly’s Closet kicked off 14 days of giveaways to celebrate. Each day new items have been added and today I’m proud to bring to you a set of two Pink Lemonade Minky Pads.  These pads are fleece backed and are truly my favorite cloth pads!  They’re comfortable, stain resistance, and absorbent.  Not to mention, they’re super soft and pretty.  An even bigger bonus for me is that they were created by a WAHM, and that always gets big props in my book.

Be sure to follow both Kelly’s Closet & Diaper Shops social media pages for more chances to win.
Facebook: Kelly’s ClosetDiaperShops Cloth Diaper Support GroupThe Cloth Diaper Whisperer
Twitter: @DiaperShops #kellyscloset #fluffiversary #clothdiapers
Instagram: @DiaperShops #kellyscloset #fluffiversary #clothdiapers
Pinterest: DiaperShops
YouTube: DiaperShops1

Each giveaway will end at midnight ET on April 14th.

Use the link below to get entered and good luck!

https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/b995e59b284/

 

*This post contains some affiliate links.  You can view our full disclosure policy here.
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Cloth Pad Tutorial: Adjustable Absorbency and Liners

AdjustablePadTutHi again!  In addition to our ‘pads three ways’ tutorials, I’m adding this adjustable absorbency pad and panty liner pattern.  Like the other patterns, this pattern will be free.

I’ll show you how to create an absorbent shell that can be used for light days or as a liner.  We’ll also be creating wingless liners to add to the shell to boost absorbency or wear on their own.

What You’ll Need

  •  The pdf containing the patterns and tutorial:  AdjustableAbsorbency&Liner.  Please print the patterns actual size and DO NOT scale them down or ‘fit to page’.
  • Fabric for the pad body top (shell):  flannel, jersey, or any other cotton or absorbent material.
  • Fabric for the pad body bottom (shell):  anti-pill or blizzard fleece.  These thicker fleece types naturally repel liquids and make a good water-resistant bottom while providing a non-slip surface against your underwear.
  • Fabric for the pad core and liners.  You want absorbent fabrics for your core.  These could include cotton flannel, cotton birdseye, cotton terry cloth, bamboo, hemp, etc.  Basically any thirsty fabric will work. Just remember that if you use microfiber or zorb, be sure to sandwich them between fabrics that are safe to be against the skin.
    You may also want to add anti-pill or blizzard fleece as a bottom layer to some of the liners as this will help them to stay put in your underwear if you choose to wear them without the shell.

    Bamboo and hemp are good choices if you want a thinner pad as they are thin, but absorbent. 2-3 layers of bamboo or hemp will give you medium flow absorbency; use more for heavy, postpartum, or overnight.

    If you use flannel, 6 layers would be a good medium flow.  You would want to add more for heavier absorbencies.  For the shells pictured, I have sewn a three layer flannel core into the shell.  Each of the liners pictured have three layers of flannel as well for buildable absorbency.

  • Sewing machine and notions (thread, needles, scissors, presser feet, etc)
  • Snaps – metal or plastic. Plastic will be more durable, but metal may be easier to get. I have used KAM snaps here. They are really fantastic quality and the pliers are easy to use.  I use a size 20 socket and stud, with size 16 snap caps.
    Plastic snap pliers can all be found at JoAnn Fabric.  I have seen metal snap pliers at Wal-Mart.
    If you can’t find snaps, dry cleaners or alteration shops can often apply them. Or you can use Velcro or a diaper pin if you have to.

If you have a serger, obviously you can do all this on the serger as well.  Learn more about cloth pads here.  Happy sewing!

Cloth Pad Tutorial: Hidden Contoured Core, Overcast Edge

MamaClothThreeWaysWelcome back again!  This is the third and final tutorial in a series of three showing you how to sew cloth pads with overcast edges three ways:  exposed core, exposed contoured core, hidden contoured core.

Today we will sew the hidden contoured core pad, the third pad pictured on the left hand side of the screen.

What You’ll Need

  • The HiddenContouredCoreOvercastEdge pdf.  Download by clicking the link. Follow along on your computer, or print out.  Please do NOT sell the pattern. I have provided it free of charge to help mamas who want to try mama cloth but cannot afford it.
  • Fabric for the pad body top:  flannel, jersey, or any other cotton or absorbent material.
  • Fabric for the pad body bottom:  anti-pill or blizzard fleece.  These thicker fleece types naturally repel liquids and make a good water-resistant bottom while providing a non-slip surface against your underwear.
  • Fabric for the pad core.  You want absorbent fabrics for your core.  These could include cotton flannel, cotton birdseye, cotton terry cloth, bamboo, hemp, etc.  Basically any thirsty fabric will work. Just remember that if you use microfiber or zorb, be sure to sandwich them between fabrics that are safe to be against the skin.
    For the pads shown, I have used three layers of bamboo fleece.  Bamboo and hemp are good choices if you want a thinner pad as they are thin, but absorbent. 2-3 layers of bamboo or hemp will give you medium flow absorbency; use more for heavy, postpartum, or overnight.
    If you use flannel, 6 layers would be a good medium/heavy flow.  You would want to add more for heavier absorbencies.
  • Sewing machine and notions (thread, needles, scissors, presser feet, etc)
  • Snaps – metal or plastic. Plastic will be more durable, but metal may be easier to get. I have used KAM snaps here. They are really fantastic quality and the pliers are easy to use.  I use a size 20 socket and stud, with size 16 snaps.
    Plastic snap pliers can all be found at JoAnn Fabric.  I have seen metal snap pliers at Wal-Mart.
    If you can’t find snaps, dry cleaners or alteration shops can often apply them. Or you can use velcro or a diaper pin if you have to.

If you have a serger, obviously you can do all this on the serger as well.  Learn more about cloth pads here.  Happy sewing!

Cloth Pad Tutorial: Exposed Contoured Core, Overcast Edge

MamaClothThreeWaysWelcome back!  This is the second tutorial in a series of three showing you how to sew cloth pads with overcast edges three ways:  exposed core, exposed contoured core, hidden contoured core.

Today we will sew the exposed contoured core pad, the second pad pictured on the left hand side of the screen.

What You’ll Need

  • The ExposedContouredCoreOverCastEdge PDF.  Download by clicking the link. Follow along on your computer, or print out.  Please do NOT sell the pattern. I have provided it free of charge to help mamas who want to try mama cloth but cannot afford it.
  • Fabric for the pad body top:  flannel, jersey, or any other cotton or absorbent material.
  • Fabric for the pad body bottom:  anti-pill or blizzard fleece.  These thicker fleece types naturally repel liquids and make a good water-resistant bottom while providing a non-slip surface against your underwear.
  • Fabric for the pad core.  You want absorbent fabrics for your core.  These could include cotton flannel, cotton birdseye, cotton terry cloth, bamboo, hemp, etc.  Basically any thirsty fabric will work. Just remember that if you use microfiber or zorb, be sure to sandwich them between fabrics that are safe to be against the skin.
    For the pads shown, I have used three layers of bamboo fleece.  Bamboo and hemp are good choices if you want a thinner pad as they are thin, but absorbent. 2-3 layers of bamboo or hemp will give you medium flow absorbency; use more for heavy, postpartum, or overnight.
    If you use flannel, 6 layers would be a good medium/heavy flow.  You would want to add more for heavier absorbencies.
  • Sewing machine and notions (thread, needles, scissors, presser feet, etc)
  • Snaps – metal or plastic. Plastic will be more durable, but metal may be easier to get. I have used KAM snaps here. They are really fantastic quality and the pliers are easy to use.  I use a size 20 socket and stud, with size 16 snaps.
    Plastic snap pliers can all be found at JoAnn Fabric.  I have seen metal snap pliers at Wal-Mart.
    If you can’t find snaps, dry cleaners or alteration shops can often apply them. Or you can use velcro or a diaper pin if you have to.

If you have a serger, obviously you can do all this on the serger as well.  Learn more about cloth pads here Happy sewing!

Mama Cloth – What Is It?

MamaClothMama cloth…  Menstrual cups…  I had been menstruating 13 years before I heard about reusable menstrual products.  When you get ‘the talk’ you’re told about pads and tampons. That’s it.  No one mentions an entire line of reusable products that are more comfortable, eco-friendly, and economical.

The first time someone told me about mama cloth, they didn’t do it in a very positive way.  And I was instantly turned off.  No way was I going to reuse a pad, even if you did wash it.  Actually, no way did I want to wash something with blood all over it.  That was gross right?   WRONG!

My curiosity about cloth pads got the better of me and I decided to do more research.  Turns out there were a lot of options out there.  Users of mama cloth swore that they were comfortable.  Users of reusable cups said they barely noticed their periods at all.  I was intrigued.

My foray into mama cloth happened while I was pregnant with my second child.  Pregnant women know the insane amount of liners you can go through.  I sewed up a few pads with adjustable absorbency and I loved them!  They were far more comfortable than their plastic backed disposable counterparts.  And they were much more breathable.  I have continued to use mama cloth since, almost two years ago.

The Basics

  • Cloth pads come in a variety of shapes/lengths/widths just like disposable pads.  If you sew your own, or find a WAHM willing to do a completely custom pad, your options are truly endless.
  • Cloth pads come in a variety of absorbencies just like disposable pads.  Liners, light flow, medium flow, heavy flow, postpartum, overnight, etc.  It’s all out there ready to purchase.  There are also pads with adjustable absorbency which is something you won’t get with disposable products.  These pads have a body (or shell) that you slip your absorbent core into.  So you can add more layers as needed.
  • If you are prone to rashes or chaffing with disposable pads, that will likely go away with cloth pads.  Cloth pads don’t contain chemicals like their disposable counterparts and they are breathable.  Pads backed with fleece or wool and containing no PUL are especially breathable.  Any type of heat rash and chafing I had with disposable pads completely disappeared with cloth.  I don’t get that sore feeling after wearing them that I did with disposable pads.
  • Since cloth pads have no chemicals, they can also reduce your flow and cramping.  I’m no doctor, but I have talked to many women who use cloth pads and/or menstrual cups.  And most of them say that they’re flow, cramps, or both decreased after switching to reusable menstrual products.  The simple explanation is that there are no chemicals in the reusable products while there are in the disposable counterparts.  The chemicals can be an irritant to many women and your body needs to flush these chemicals out of your body – thus a heavier flow and more cramping.
  • When you’re out, you can store dirty pads in a waterproof makeup bag.  Most cloth pad retailers also sell small wet/dry bags designed to hold dirty pads and clean pads in separate pockets.
  • Cloth pads are pretty easy to care for.  And if you do it properly, they will last YEARS, saving you a lot of money.
  • So how do you care for them?  If you cloth diaper, you can rinse your pads in cold water and throw them in your dirty diaper pail.  Rinsing them actually isn’t even necessary, but it does help prevent staining.  If you don’t have cloth diapers to wash, you can get a small wet bag, or one of those tiny trash cans that you often see at ice cream parlors for sample spoons.  These trash cans are sold at the Dollar Tree and many other retailers.  Again, rinse in cold water to help prevent staining, and throw them in the pail.  Store your dirty pads here until the end of your cycle or whenever you are ready to wash.  I wash mama cloth every other day with my dirty diapers.  Before you wash, rinse them again in cold water (Some prefer an overnight soak with a bit of vinegar and cold water.  Just note that vinegar CAN break down PUL if you use a pad backed with PUL).  Throw them in the washer on their own OR with regular laundry.  Just don’t use fabric softener when washing mama cloth as it can cause repelling and greatly diminish the pad’s absorbency.  Hang dry, or throw them in the dryer.
  • What about staining?  Some materials are more prone to staining than others.  Pads topped with microfleece, suedecloth, and minky are actually rather hard to stain.  Natural fibers like cotton, hemp, and bamboo stain more easily.  Rinsing with cold water before placing in your pail or wet bag helps reduce staining.  If your pads do stain, soaking in oxi-clean or sunning them with lemon juice can help remove the stains.  And remember, a stain DOES NOT mean that something is dirty.
  • An added bonus?  Cloth pads come in lots of pretty colors and prints.

MamaCloth2So, are you curious?  Below you’ll find a list of places to purchase reusable menstrual products.  I have also created free patterns to make your own menstrual pads and liners which are linked at the bottom of the post.  Try your hand at sewing your own cloth pads!  It’s a fairly easy project and you might just like the results 😉

Cloth Menstrual Care Retailers
(This is just a small list.  You can do a google search for reviews and retailers to suit your own menstrual care needs.  Not all bodies are shaped the same, not all cycles are the same.  But there is something out there for everyone.  Check your local area for retailers as well. Cloth diaper stores and natural health care stores are great places to look.)

Pads

Cups

Wet Bags

Cloth Pad Patterns

Wet Bag Patterns

*Disclosure:  Please note that some of the links provided are affiliate links

School of Cloth: Diapering in Special Circumstances

week4This week we wrap up the School of Cloth by focusing on diapering in special circumstances.  You can link up to this week’s post and read other posts here.

Have you ever been home alone or at grandma’s and realized that you just used your last disposable diaper?  Maybe you are a one car family or maybe you don’t get paid for two more days and there is no money for another bag or box of diapers.  You can make cloth diapering work with just a few common items found in every household.  Check out the link above for more resources on cloth diapering with household items.  This is great even for cloth diapering families because we all get behind on laundry sometimes.

Below you’ll find picture tutorials on using receiving blankets and t-shirts as a diapers.  This is a fantastic way to start cloth diapering or to bulk up your cloth diaper stash.  They wash and dry quickly since they unfold to thin layers.  Resources for folding flat diapers:
http://www.osocozy.com/wp/?page_id=497
http://www.wikihow.com/Fold-a-Cloth-Diaper

See the next paragraph for information on covers to keep these diapers waterproof and fasteners to keep them on.

Receiving Blanket Diaper


T-Shirt Diaper

You’ll need a cover for these to be waterproof and a Snappi or diaper pins to hold the diaper on.

Fasteners:  You can find a four pack of Prym diaper pins at Wal-Mart for $1 and they work great.  They’re normally in the baby section.  I do not recommend a safety-pin.  Diaper pins have a little cap that snaps down making it almost impossible for babies to get them off, regular safety pins do not.  Snappis, boingos, and diaper pins can be purchased at most cloth diaper retailers and even amazon. See how to apply a Snappi here and a Boingo here.

Covers: To keep your child’s clothing dry, you need a diaper cover when using non-waterproof diapers like those above.  You can use the ‘plastic’ pants from Wal-Mart and Babys ‘R Us.  They will get the job done, but they won’t last long.  When you’re just getting started, they might be the easiest to get.  We used them until I could make enough covers to last several days.  By that time, they had pretty much worn out.

There are many inexpensive, quality covers you can buy.   Our personal favorite are flips.

If you are trying to make an ’emergency’ diaper or just want a no-sew homemade stash, check out this no-sew fleece cover from Dirty Diaper Laundry. It’s simple to make and inexpensive.

Fleece Diaper Wrap

Fleece Diaper Wrap

If you’re even the tiniest bit crafty, you can sew a cover.  Fleece is easy to get and inexpensive.  It is also water-resistant.  Most of our diaper covers are fleece.  Just make sure you are using 100% polyester fleece. First, check around your house for unused fleece blankets, robes, and hoodies.  Check thrift stores as well.  Anti-pill and blizzard fleece from JoAnn Fabric work well.  Most of our covers are made from the Rita’s Rump Cover pattern.  It’s a free pattern. You can get hook and loop (velcro) from most craft stores and lots of big box stores.  I really like the Babyville H&L and JoAnn carries it as well. It is really strong and lasts well.

Here are some other household items that work great for diapers.

See how inexpensive cloth diapering  can be?!? It can be easy and you can do it!  Share your stories with us. I welcome questions and am happy to help you start your cloth diapering journey.  Comment, email us, find us on Facebook.  All our contact info is in the Contact Info tab and I’d be happy to help you.  I love what cloth diapers have done for our family and I’m betting you will too.

*This post contains some affiliate links.

Small Ways to Make a Big Difference – Waste Not

There are many, many opportunities every day to choose reusable products instead of disposable products. It is very easy to do and I don’t think most people realize how many reusable options are available.  Try them all or a few, and feel good about wasting less.10Reusable

 

There are also way to clean effectively without harsh chemicals.Cleaning
  • Vinegar and water clean very effectively without harsh chemicals.  Mix equal parts water and vinegar to clean counters, tables, cabinets, toilets, sinks, and even floors.  Use 2 parts vinegar and one part water for particularly messy jobs.
  • White vinegar can replace fabric softener effectively in most water types.  Your clothes won’t smell like vinegar either.
  • Soap nuts can effectively clean most laundry.  They are also great to wash floors with.  Place your soap nuts bag in a buck with a 1/2-1 cup vinegar and fill with hot water.
  • An equal parts solution of plain rubbing alcohol and water cleans glass very well. You can also keep a bottle handy in the bathroom to wipe down toilets, sink hardware, and potties.
  • A magic eraser (or even the Dollar Tree equivalent) with a little squirt of dish soap takes away soap scum very easily.  You can use without the dish soap and just put in a little more elbow grease.
  • Magic erasers also take scuffs, crayon, and marker off walls, doors, tables, and floors.

DIY – Reusable Cotton Rounds

1-1FaceScrubbies

Ahhh, the scrap fabric bin. What to do with it all?

I try to use as many reusable products as I can.  I have always hated the way cotton balls feel so I was happy to find a reusable alternative in fabric cotton rounds.

Cotton rounds are a great way to use up fabric scraps and have many, many uses.  Some of the things we use them for are:  makeup removal, applying astringent or alcohol to the skin, nail polish removal, applying diaper rash cream, cleaning little noses, drying off baby’s bottom after using a wipe.  And the list goes on.

These little guys are super simple to make and are a great beginner’s project when learning to sew.  You’ll need two pieces of scrap fabric for each round.  I prefer flannel cotton for most uses, but almost any soft cotton will work.  Polyester fleece is excellent at removing eye makeup so I like to put that on one side for my makeup removing scrubbies.  Please note that if you use these for removing nail polish, they are definitely going to get stained and stay that way.  But they’re so cheap to make, it doesn’t really matter!  Use the ugly ones for nail polish, keep the pretty ones for other uses.

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The Tools

What you’ll need:
Scrap Fabric – (flannel, fleece, jersey, hemp, etc)
Scissors
Pins
Sewing Machine
Thread
Compass to draw a circle or a round object to trace one

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Using your compass, draw a circle that is about 3″. To get a 3″ circle, set your compass on 1.5″. If you want a larger or smaller scrubbie, just divide that number in half and that’s what you’ll set your compass on. You can find a compass at the Dollar Tree, Walmart, or any office supply store.

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If you don’t have a compass, no worries. Just find a cup or bowl with an opening roughly the size of the scrubbie you’d like and trace it.

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Place your two pieces of scrap fabric with wrong sides touching other. You want the right sides of both fabrics facing out.

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Pin your circle to your stacked pieces of fabric.

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Cut around your paper circle so that you get a round fabric stack.

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Take out the pin and set your paper circle aside. Pin around the outer edge of your fabric so that the two pieces stay together. If you’re not a pinner, just put one pin in the middle so the fabric doesn’t slide.

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Choose your thread. You can do a matching color or a contrasting color. You could even do one color to match the bottom in the bobbin and a color to match the top for your spool. Variegated thread is also a pretty option.

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If you have an overcast foot for your machine, use it. The overcast foot is on the left hand side in the photo. If you don’t have one a regular foot will work fine.

10FaceScrubbies copy

If your machine has mock serge stitches (overcast stitches), use one of those. I prefer stitch 7 on my machine, but stitch 8 works well too.
If your machine does not have a mock serge stitch, choose the regular zig zag stitch (stitch 4 in the picture).

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No matter what stitch you choose, you’ll want it to be a tight stitch to keep the edges from fraying too much. I typically set the length to 1-1.5 and the width to 3.5-4. Experiment on a scrap piece of fabric to see what you prefer.

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Butt the fabric up to the edge. You can always adjust this as you start to sew. This is where having an overcast foot comes in handy-the little bar on the foot is an easy marker for where you want the edge of your fabric to sit. You want the fabric to sit so that the stitch landing on the left hand side sinks into the fabric and the stitch landing on the right drops just over the fabric.

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Sink your first stitch or two and then use your back-stitch button. If you’re using a mock serge, you’ll likely just get a reinforcement stitch. With a zig zag, your machine should actually back-stitch.

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Start sewing. You can go as slowly as you need to get the hang of going around the curves. Remove pins as you go being careful not to sew over them as they can damage your machine’s needle.

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Keep sewing…

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As your sewing, stop to make sure your fabric hasn’t shifted and that your stitches are sinking into the back fabric as well. If you’ve missed the back, it’s okay! Just pull your work off the machine, repin, and start again where the fabric slipped.

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When you’re sewing around and about to reach the beginning stitches, grab your loose threads under your fingers so they stay straight and don’t get tangled in your stitches.

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Sew over your beginning stitches for just a bit to help reinforce them.

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Use your back-stitch button once more.

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Lift your presser foot.

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If you’re using an overcast foot, gently pull the scrubbie to the back of the machine and then to the side so you can pull your stitches off the overcast bar. Cut your threads.

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If you’ve used a regular foot, just pull that baby to the side and cut your threads.

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Clip your threads close to the scrubbie, being careful not to clip into your stitches.

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Good job! You just finished your first scrubbie.

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As nice and neat on the back as on the front.

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You can check your stitches to make sure both sides were caught. If they weren’t, run it back through the machine once.

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Now, go back through your scraps and make more!

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You can even make up several to add to little gift baskets. A pamper me basket or cosmetic bag full of goodies makes for a nice, but inexpensive gift idea.
All those little goodies are from Avon and they are great stocking stuffers.

Ah! I happen to love that fall view outside my sewing desk window.

Ah! I happen to love that fall view outside my sewing desk window.

You should be able to finish off a set in 15 minutes or less. It is entirely normal to get some fraying around the edges after the first couple of washes.  Just clip any loose strings.

Come back and show off what you made!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School of Cloth: Week 2 Investing in Cloth Diapers

week2Link up to this week’s school of cloth here.

I did a post a few weeks ago about cloth diapering on a budget.  You can find that post here.  There is information on how to cloth diaper with no money, cloth diapering with a conservative budget, and cloth diaper banks for those in need.

I started our cloth diaper journey with less than $30.  I went through our closets and found old t-shirts, receiving blankets, sheets, and fleece items we were no longer using.  I combed thrift stores for fleece, flannel, terry towels.  And I purchased inexpensive wash cloths, elastic, hook and loop, and flannel to make our own diapers.

You can make your own cloth wipes with very basic sewing skills. It is actually a great project for beginning sewers.  I’ve talked about resources for learning to make cloth diapers here and here. Or you can browse the cloth diaper section of the blog for more information on cloth diaper making and the use of cloth diapers.

As our finances have allowed, I have purchased more materials to make diapers and even diapers that were manufactured by someone other than myself.  Our diaper stash started with about 12-15 diapers and has since grown to probably 70 or so diapers, several diaper covers, and countless inserts.

 I recently discovered the flats and flip diapering system.  I wanted something that worked well for when we travel and these are definitely a winner!  I purchased fifteen flats, five flips covers, and a wetbag for $60.  This is more than enough to diaper my TWO boys for a day away from home, and that includes doubling up on flats at night. I do add a doubler because I have a one and two-year old who pee a bit more than a baby does.

I think the easiest way to start cloth diapering if you have limited funds and need to buy diapers instead of making them is to start small.  Buy just a little at a time so that you are gradually buying less and less disposable diapers.

I have never had to diaper two kids in disposables. We started cloth diapering before my youngest was born.  But, I was spending $45 a month on disposable diapers and wipes for one baby.  And that was with a $40 a year Sam’s Club membership to buy their brand in bulk. Including the membership, that works out to approximately $580 a year for ONE child. I would imagine that would have been at least double for two, so approximately $1120 a year. Yikes!

Even after indulging my diaper sewing addiction (and building our diaper stash to a number that makes cloth diapering two comfortable), I haven’t spent anywhere close to even $500. We even have cloth training pants.  My diapers are still in good condition, some of them still look brand new.  So if baby #3 comes along, they will be using the same diapers and saving us even more money per year.

Another bonus is that we rarely have diaper rashes with cloth diapers.  I used to buy tub after tub of desitin.  And then there was the antifungal for the occasional yeast rash. We haven’t had a yeast rash since starting cloth diapers.  I use CJ’s BUTTer as a diaper rash cream and preventative now which cost me about $15 for 3-4 months of cream for two kiddos. I probably use it 1-2 times a day on each child. I also use it on my son’s eczema. So it really goes a long way and works great for us. It also smells fantastic which is just nice for me.

So, do you really safe  money using cloth? YES!  Our utility expenses did not increase drastically either as cloth has only added 2-3 extra loads of laundry per week.  Give it a try, see how much you save.

Our Handmade Stash…of Diapers

There are few places where you hear the words “Show me your stash”…  Who knew one of those places would be among other cloth diaper moms?  Some stashes are small, some are big, some are fashionable, some are basic.  They all get the job done though!

So here are some shots of a bit of our mostly handmade stash.  All those pictured were made by me and cover my two kiddos bums daily.  We have an ungodly amount others that I either didn’t take a picture of, or have lost the picture too.  Patterns I’ve used include three of my own, Rita’s Rump Pocket, Rita’s Rump Cover, Katrina’s Longies, and Katrina’s Soakers.